PixiPort Fine Art Photography Gallery
PixiPort Fine Art Photography Gallery Newsletter )
 HAPPY 4th of JULY!!!! July 1 2003 
in this issue
  • Photo Of The Month
  • Featured-Gary Auerbach
  • Featured Jonell Pickett
  • Featured William Discount
  • Weekly Gallery
  • Rodrigo Damian Fernandez
  • The Voice Behind The Lens

  • Dear Helyn,

    The year 2003 is rapidly moving along. It is already July. PixiPort wishes all of our readers a safe and happy 4th of July!!! This edition of the PixiPort Newsletter has several featured artists to view and absorb. As always "enjoy the journey".

    Photo Of The Month

    Patrick Loehr Pixiport's POTM winner, Congratulations Patrick!

    POTM is sponsored by Digital Art Supplies and winner receives a muti pack of fine art photo papers.

    Winner's Package

    Digital Art Supplies has the best prices, service and is where PixiPort buys art supplies. We are proud to recommend them for any of your digital art needs.

    View POTM Winners....

    Featured-Gary Auerbach
    Platinum Fine Art Photographer Gary Auerbach is one of the featured artists and four galleries of his wonderful platinum photos are available for your viewing pleasure. PixiPort welcomes Gary and his exciting quality photo artwork. Below is Gary's biographical information.

    Twelve years ago, after a career changing injury, I turned my full attention to photography. I was disillusioned to find that much of my earlier work from 25 years ago was beginning to show signs of deterioration. I did not want to spend my time working in a photographic art form with materials that caused the print to self-destruct. Since the 1850's it has been well documented that silver-based photographic methods have a lack of long-term image permanence.

    Living in Tucson, I was fortunate to utilize the world renown resources from the University of Arizona's Center for Creative Photography. I researched how one could make a permanent photograph. There was the cyanotype, an iron process; the carbon print, using graphite; and the platinum print, using platinum metals. Viewing examples of each, I was drawn to the platinotype with its warm tonal scale, and its sharp as a tack image, because it requires a negative the same size as the image. The platinotype image is softened because it is printed on watercolor paper. Since the emulsion is hand-coated, there is an organic feeling about completing the print to the finished product.

    In looking at early photographic images, I was drawn to three photographers in particular: Eduard Steichen, Edward Curtis and Alfred Steiglitz. All produced portraits of people that captured a soul within them for me.

    I taught myself how to print, using 6 x 6 cm negatives that I had from my many years of working with a Hasselblad. It was terrific, no darkrooms were necessary, and no more chemical smells. Printing outside in the sun, I felt like a pioneer photographer. I knew then that I loved the process - and the look. But my negatives were small, and so were my prints.

    I attempted to work with negatives that were enlarged, but found that I could not get the look of the images printed from larger formats. So I began the process of moving up in negative size. That worked well because there was a slight learning curve to hand-coating larger images, 4x5, 5x7 and 8x10. Ultimately, I found a used Wisner 11x14 technical field camera and with that, I felt that I found my niche.

    Portraiture and architecture is my specialty -- large format platinotypes. Photographic images that are made to last 500 to a thousand years

    In the process, I hope to educate a public that knows very little about the platinotype and the platinum photograph.

    Visit Gallery...

    Featured Jonell Pickett
    What our eyes pass by are instances of incredible imagery. My photographic works refocus our brief glimpses to reveal the sensual hues, vivid rhythms and brilliant reflections of the microcosm. The subjects are common forms, up close, whose surfaces are transformed through light and color, creating a vibrant, abstract and emotional beauty. The images offer a moment to transfix on the ethereal minutia within our world. Jonelle Pickett

    Biography

    A resident of Southern California since birth, I have been bathed in the beautiful Pacific sunlight my entire life. As a child I was fascinated how light and shadow and colors played out before me, and my reverence of these qualities greatly influenced my development as an artist.

    My training at Cal State Long Beach (where I received my B.A. and Art Education Teaching Credential) developed my interest in details, especially the reflectivity of color. Inspired by the paintings of Vermeer, and the ethereal qualities of Rothko, my art strived to capture echoing colors, suspending them in an image to show others what I see and what I insist exists. .

    With my painting style of realism being encompassing and time consuming, I turned to photography as a way to continue my studio work while teaching. Through this artistic medium I found I could record a reality of vibrancy that exists within everyday objects, enhanced by reflections created by bright sunlight bouncing between colors. My work tends to be in a triptych format to relate that sense of the instance, of time and movement. Photography also enables me to capture a seemingly abstract image of a very real detail (hence the name "MicroRealism"). My work has been shown in galleries in New York, Los Angeles, Texas and Nebraska, and at the Palm Springs Desert Museum.

    Visit Gallery...

    Featured William Discount
    William Alan Discount, born 1929 in Greenport, New York. Graduate of the School of Visual Arts. Illustrated Children's books until 1950, then entered Advertising as an artist and later an Art Director. The last 25 years has Free-Lanced from Hauppauge. In 1984 he merged his talent with the computer and started experimenting with digital images. The result was an ongoing series of striking and realistic visuals of landmarks and other subjects. Mr. Discount recently developed a series of original art entitled "Americana Today". A modern version of Folk Art. .

    For years I illustrated homes (Front elevations and plans in 1 color) for builders. I recently converted the front elevations to 3/4 views, added color and entourage. I also Photographed each and every shop in the village of Port Jefferson for use in my attempt of Digital Watercolors. I then used the photos for reference and drew the shops in the same "folk art" technique as I did the houses. Next I assembled each scene as you can see. I am in the process of producing additional PortJeff Scenes and have been commissioned to do modern folk art of another village.

    I am in the process of producing additional PortJeff Scenes and have been commissioned to do modern folk art of another village.

    Visit Gallery...

    Weekly Gallery
    Each and every week twenty four photographers update their work on the weekly gallery.

    This is a sure way to keep up with your favorite photographer's offerings on a regular basis and enjoy their most current creations. Links to their individual galleries are alongside their images.

    Please feel free to send these artists an email. All of the artists would love to hear from you and appreciate someone taking the time to comment and encourage them concerning their work.

    Weekly Photo Gallery

    Rodrigo Damian Fernandez
    Updates in Rodrigo gallery. Rodrigo is one of PixiPorts surreal artists with a flair for the unique.

    Rodrigo Damian Fernandez is 26 years of age. He is a native and resident of Argentina. He is a graduate (class of 2000) from the Superior School of Visual Arts. His degree is in Illustration and he was awarded the title of "Illustrator" upon graduation.

    In his artwork, Rodrigo utilizes multiple methods to gain the unique photo images that he creates. These include the use of graphite, acrylics, and collage technique as enhancements to his photo images. His works have been published most notably in the Spanish edition of "Computer Arts" among others.

    Visit Gallery...

    The Voice Behind The Lens
    ELLIOTT ERWITT'S HANDBOOK
    A BOOK REVIEW
    (Let's Review the Entire Body of Work)
    Michael Dubiner

    I was very excited to learn that one of my favorite photographers, Elliott Erwitt, was publishing yet another book, Handbook. What made the book even more attractive was it's retail price, $19.95. Erwitt is one of only a small handful of Street Photographers that I consider among the very best. His viewpoint is deceptively simple, and yet he often humanizes his subjects with a sly touch of humor. While a few of his most famous images are photojournalistic in nature, most of them appear to be spontaneous and it is often apparent that his subjects do not realize they have been photographed. This lends the images a wonderful intimacy and immediacy. While I do not try to imitate Erwitt, I certainly can say that he has had a great and positive influence on my image making.

    Sadly, Handbook was a disappointment. As stated on the dust cover, "Human (human and sometimes non- human) hands are, with the possible exception of the eyes, the most expressive parts of the body...". In fact, many of Handbook's best images capture the fleeting communication, both conscious and unconscious, created by the hands that Erwitt saw as he traveled through life with his camera. Instead of the handsome book I anticipated, I received less than the best of Erwitt, in what appeared to be a forced attempt to fit some of the images to the theme of the book. What is that expression; "you get what you pay for"?

    Handbook, as it turns out is a small book . Many of the best of the images it contains are hand-me-downs, previously published in Erwitt's other books, sometimes in several of them. The remainder were a mixture of Erwitt at his witty best and other images that were uninspired and cliche.

    Erwitt has followed in the tradition of many productive modern photographers, breaking down their monumental bodies of work into subject related monographs. Sometimes Erwitt has done this superbly, such as in Museum Watching, a book depicting people in museums and Son of a bitch, a dog lovers delight. Others have been mediocre such as On the Beach. This time, sadly, the format has not worked very well at all.

    Continue with Review

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